Brunel University London
Browse
1/1
7 files

Origin of continental red beds: warming from above or heating from below?

Download all (2.8 MB)
dataset
posted on 2024-06-24, 09:21 authored by Lianting Jiang, Chun’an Tang, Bin GongBin Gong, Zhen Chen, Tiantian Chen, Zhanjie Qin, Guoneng Chen

The formation of continental red beds is generally considered to be related to an arid climate. Heating experiments (performed by L.J. and G.C.) using dried black mud sediment also demonstrate that the reddening may be caused by the transformation of goethite to haematite that begins at approximately 150℃ under anhydrous conditions, and increasing the temperature to 450℃ is positively correlated with the red colour and peak value of haematite. If this process applies to continental red beds, it implies a thermal origin of red beds as a result of high diagenetic temperatures rather than as the cause of their deposition under an arid climate. Namely, subsiding red-bed basins are heated from below rather than warmed from above. Here, we further strengthen this idea by new evidence from borehole cores drilled from red beds in SE China, showing a clear geological section from the surface soil to red beds to bottom granite. The data reveal that the continental red beds formed at least at a temperature within 150-400℃, and the underlying granite usually formed at temperatures greater than 600℃. Our results imply a possible relationship between continental red bed events and Earth’s thermal cycles.

History

Usage metrics

    Brunel University London

    Categories

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC